17 December 2018

  |  CBI Press Team

News

Our response to Government's Good Work Plan

We responded to the Government's Good Work Plan

Our response to Government's Good Work Plan

Matthew Fell, CBI Chief UK Policy Director, said:

“Work that’s flexible and fair is essential to the success of the UK’s labour market.

"Companies support the Good Work agenda because there is a strong business case for it. Focusing on issues like employee engagement, fairness and inclusion boost productivity as well as being the right thing to do.

“Businesses support a strong floor of workplace rights, and it’s right that these laws keep pace with changes in the economy and society. They welcome a new law giving all workers the right to request more predictable working hours which will help to facilitate the conversations that are essential to ensuring flexibility benefits both parties. However, legislation to amend employment status rules risks making the law less able to adapt to new forms of work in the future.”

On the removal of the Swedish Derogation, Matthew said:

“Companies have consistently called for reform to ensure the current rules are working as intended. A phased removal over time is needed to help firms and their workers identify a suitable alternative contractual arrangement.”

On consulting on changes to National Minimum Wage rules, Matthew said:

“The Minimum Wage is an integral part of the strong floor of rights that ensure fairness at work. Businesses will welcome changes designed to ensure that employers can continue to offer contracts that give workers greater income security without breaking a technicality in minimum wage rules.”

On the UK Labour Market Enforcement Strategy 2018/19, Matthew said:

“Effective enforcement of employment rules is vital to fair competition. 95% of companies think that labour market enforcement should be improved. Businesses will welcome being made aware of non-compliance in their supply chains as these are also a breach of contract. Joint-working can ensure the best outcome for affected workers.”

On naming and shaming for non-payment of tribunal awards, Matthew said:

“Good businesses understand that Employment Tribunal awards must be paid. Naming companies who fail to do so may help in some cases but is unlikely to have much impact on firms who do not have a well-known brand.”